A Good Night’s Sleep Could Protect You From The Common Cold – Huffington Post

 

Huffington Post

A Good Night's Sleep Could Protect You From The Common Cold
Huffington Post
The study involved 164 healthy people who wore wristbands (similar to fitness trackers) for a week to monitor their sleep habits. Then, participants were given nasal drops containing rhinovirus, the virus that causes the common cold. The subjects were …
Easy way to cut down on colds this fallNewsday
Those who get less sleep are more likely to get a coldmessenger-inquirer
Lack of sleep ups your chances of catching a coldWWL First News
Healio –Bury Free Press –Business Insider
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View full post on sleep – Google News

Schedule Sleep In Your Calendar To Protect Your Sleep Cycle – Lifehacker Australia

 

Lifehacker Australia

Schedule Sleep In Your Calendar To Protect Your Sleep Cycle
Lifehacker Australia
As business blog Inc suggests, sleep is an appointment just like any other. You need to make time for it, and there are consequences if you don't. Because sleep won't fire us if we miss a meeting, we tend to think it's less important to put it in the

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View full post on sleep – Google News

Pandora’s iOS and Android apps get sleep timer, might protect against data … – Engadget

 

Pandora's iOS and Android apps get sleep timer, might protect against data
Engadget
Having relinquished the 40-hour mobile listening limit (at least, starting September), Pandora's added a new sleep timer to its apps too. It's probably a lesser issue, given Pandora's aforementioned announcement, but the improvement (apparently coming 
Pandora App Update Adds A Sleep Timer And NissanConnect SupportAndroid Police
Pandora Update Introduces Sleep Timer and NissanConnect ControlsDroid Life
Pandora to remove 40h streaming cap, adds Sleep Timer and NissanConnect to Android Community

all 4 news articles »

View full post on sleep – Google News

NIH researchers identify pathway that may protect against cocaine addiction

 

A study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health gives insight into changes in the reward circuitry of the brain that may provide resistance against cocaine addiction. Scientists found that strengthening signaling along a neural pathway that runs through the nucleus accumbens — a region of the brain involved in motivation, pleasure, and addiction — can reduce cocaine-seeking behavior in mice.

View full post on NIH News Releases